Undergraduate Courses, Spring 2011

Times and locations of class meetings are subject to change. Consult the UF Schedule of Courses for official class times and locations and an explanation of the class period abbreviations.

Lower Division (1000–2000) Special Content Courses

Note: Only course descriptions are listed below. For a comprehensive summary of course numbers, sections, times and locations, titles, and instructors, see the following web page:

Spring 2011, Lower Division, Special Content

AML 2410

Issues in American Literature and Culture: The Environment

Jordan Dominy

This course will cover environmental issues in American literature and culture from the Transcendentalist period to the present. Focusing on ecocritical approaches, we will explore the significance of these works to their historical contexts and their connections to various environmental movements. We will also incorporate current environmental issues/events in our class discussions. Topics covered will include the American pastoral; depictions of wilderness; apocalyptic writing as environmental parable; literary portrayals of animals; the role of nature in science fiction; intersections of nature, gender, and race; and representations of nature and environmental activism in popular culture.

This course is designed to provide 6000 words toward the meeting of the Writing Requirement. Students will be graded based on the following assignments: weekly quizzes, 9 300-word responses submitted to our course blog, blog comments, 1 discussion-leading presentation, 1 short paper (4–5 pages), 1 final paper (7–8 pages), and daily participation in class discussion.

AML 2410

Issues in American Literature and Culture: Adaptation Studies

Kevin Sherman

This course will focus on theories of adaptation as they relate to American literature and film. We will consider how the discipline of film studies examines the transition from novel to film, considering questions such as the following: what does it mean to be “true” or the “original” text? what happens when someone adapts his or her own work to another medium? We will also examine cases in which the original model and its adaptation are part of the same text.

This course is designed to provide 6000 words toward the meeting of the Writing Requirement. We will read four novels (each of which has resulted in at least two cinematic adaptations), three textbooks on adaptation and intertextuality, and a course pack. Primary assignments include: in-class daily quizzes, a 5-page formal analysis, a 6–7 page draft of a critical analysis, and a final version (9–10 polished pages) of that critical analysis.

AML 2410

Issues in American Literature and Culture: 20th-Century Improvisation

Paige Fowler

What counts as art? What does it mean to improvise? Throughout the twentieth century, these questions emerged as new literary and artistic forms were developed in order confront unique historical situations and events. We will study writers and artists who improvised new literary forms and subject matters (e.g., does an unrhymed poem about an old woman’s chair count as art?). Also, we will ask how these changes in form and substance helped change perceptions about broader social issues such as class, race, gender, religion, and geographical region. Gertrude Stein, Flannery O’Connor, William Burroughs, Ishmael Reed, Sun Ra, Talking Heads, and Cormac McCarthy will be among the writers and artists we study.

This course is designed to provide 6000 words toward the meeting of the Writing Requirement. Assignments will include a short mid-term paper (5 pages), one final paper (10 pages), at least 5 short responses (1 page), as well as a formal written presentation (1–2 pages).

AML 2410

Issues in American Literature and Culture: Social Class in Black Women’s Literary Works

Robin Brooks

This course explores portrayals of social class in the literature of Black women writers. Students will examine the diverse meanings of social class in U.S. literature and culture, as well as the impact of social class on family, community, and professional relationships. One key issue will be the question of empowerment and disempowerment through social class status.

This course is designed to provide 6000 words toward the meeting of the Writing Requirement. Writing assignments will include five short critical essays, a mid-semester paper, and a final paper. Students will also make one presentation.

ENC 1145

Writing about the Middle Ages

Matt Snyder

The Middle Ages are still with us in films, television, music, video games, comic books, graphic novels, and theme parks. In this course, we will examine and write about the persistent appeal of the medieval in our present age. We will consider how medieval literary works have been adapted to contemporary media forms.  We will explore the perceived difference between academic and popular medievalism.

This course is designed to provide 6000 words toward the meeting of the Writing Requirement. Writing assignments will include two five-page essays and five two-page response papers.

ENC 1145

Writing about Animated African Americans

Nik Bajorek

In this course, we will examine how African Americans are represented in various animated forms including films, TV series, anime, comics, and graphic novels. We will consider how animation provides a unique space in which to offer complex and challenging views of Black identity and culture. Texts will likely include The Boondocks, The Cleveland Show, South Park, Afro Samurai, Coonskin, Freaknik: The Musical, and Incognegro, as well as some scholarly and theoretical texts.

This course is designed to provide 6000 words toward the meeting of the Writing Requirement. Writing assignments will include weekly 300-word responses to the assigned texts and two six-page critical/analytical essays (one at midterm and one at the end).

ENC 1145

Writing about Television

Tania Darlington

This course will introduce students to the study of television as a medium with its own specific characteristics and genres. Students will learn the history of television studies, exploring the field’s main issues and approaches. In addition, students will examine how the internet has affected the relationship between television shows and their fans. 

This course is designed to provide 6000 words toward the meeting of the Writing Requirement. Students will be responsible for posting weekly reading/viewing responses on the designated course blog. They will write three critical papers of 1,500 words each, which may include genre studies and critical or historical analyses. Also, students will be responsible for one class presentation on a television show of their choosing.

ENC 1145

Writing about American Masculinities

Kristin Allukian

This course will examine genders, particularly masculinities, as they are depicted in nineteenth-century American literature. We will read, think, and write about texts dealing with historical events that affect these principle terms. We will investigate how gender identity is formed by forces such as society, language, and perception. Toward the end of the semester, we will turn to contemporary discussions about masculinities. Students will have the chance to explore and challenge their own ideas about gender identity and masculinities. Course material will be drawn from the poetry, fiction, and nonfiction of authors such as Emerson, Hawthorne, Melville, Phelps, and Alcott.

This course is designed to provide 6000 words toward the meeting of the Writing Requirement. Writing assignments will include four close reading exercises, an annotated bibliography, a review of literary criticism, and a final research-based paper.

ENC 1145

Writing about Wilderness

Sarah Mitchem

What is the American “wilderness,” and how has literature influenced our understanding of it? What does it mean to call something or someone “wild?” We will explore how various texts have used these terms, both figuratively and legally, to identify and manipulate plants, animals and people. In particular, we will examine how these ideas continue to shape our understanding of ecology, economy, and culture in the United States. Readings will include historical texts, folktales, poems, and contemporary novels.

This course is designed to provide 6000 words toward the meeting of the Writing Requirement. Major assignments will include reflective narratives, a mid-term exam, a final research paper, and a creative project in any medium other than writing.

ENL 2930

From Page to Screen: Humanities, Visual Rhetoric, and Visual Culture

Sid Dobrin

This course will engage six primary inquiries:

In order to engage these inquiries, we will read about the shift to visual/screen culture from print culture. We will develop analytical skills for reading and interpreting visuals based on several established methodologies, including, but not limited to semiotics, social critique, and technical critique. Along the way, we will examine visual design strategies, digital manipulations, and various “ways of seeing.”

This course carries University of Florida General Education Humanities (H) credit.