Calendar of Events

Unless otherwise noted, all events are open to the public and free of charge.

Fall 2014

9/15/14

German filmmaker Ula Stöckl, film screening of The Cat has Nine Lives (Neun Leben hat die Katze, 1968). Filmmaker Ula Stöckl will screen The Cat has Nine Lives (Neun Leben hat die Katze, 1968, with subtitles) with Introduction and Q&A as part of Barbara Mennel’s graduate seminar on New German Cinema. The screening is open to interested faculty members and students.

Ula Stöckl’s career as a representative of the New German Cinema began in 1963 at the Film School in Ulm. She has made 23 films. The Cat has Nine Lives is considered the first postwar West German feminist film. She is currently teaching film production at UCF School of Visual Arts and Design. The event is funded by the Waldo W. Neikirk Term Professorship. For questions, please contact Barbara Mennel at mennel@ufl.edu.

9/17/14

Marketwise Event: CV and Cover Letter with Laurie Gries (Assistant Professor, English, UF) and Leah Rosenberg (Associate Professor, English, UF). Pugh 210. Deadline to turn in materials is 9/12/14. Please send your documents to rosenber@ufl.edu.

10/1/14

“International and Minority Science Fiction in a Global World.” A day-long seminar on global cultures and subcultures of sf, co-sponsored by the Departments of English and Spanish and Portuguese Studies, the UF Center for Women’s Studies and Gender Research, and the UF Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere. Featured speakers include: Luis Álvarez Castro (UF, Spanish and Portuguese Studies), M. Elizabeth Ginway (UF, Spanish and Portuguese Studies), Andrew Gordon (UF, English, Emeritus), Terry Harpold (UF, English), Tace Hedrick (UF, English), Kostas Kapparis (UF, Classics), Jennifer Rea (UF, Classics), Stephanie A. Smith (UF, English), and Philip Wegner (UF, English). The seminar will conclude with a keynote address by noted Cuban sf author Anbel Enríquez Piñeiro. For more information on the seminar, contact Terry Harpold.

10/1/14

Marketwise Event: Dissertation Abstract and Research Statement with Susan Hegeman (Professor, English, UF). Pugh 210. Deadline to turn in materials is 9/26/14. Please send your documents to rosenber@ufl.edu.

10/15/14

Marketwise Event: Teaching Philosophy with Anuja Madan (PhD Candidate, English, UF), Katie Reed (PhD Candidate, Musicology, UF), and Jodi Schorb (Assistant Professor, English, UF). 1:00–2:30 in Pugh 210. Everyone welcome: RSVP to rosenber@ufl.edu.

10/23/14–10/25/14

The English Graduate Organization’s 2014 conference, How to Feel About Affect, will take place Thursday, October 23–Saturday, October 25.

11/5/14

Marketwise Event: Interviews with Marilisa Jimenez (Phd, English, UF 2012; Research Associate, Center for Puerto Rican Studies, Hunter College), Allison Rittmayer (PhD, English, UF 2013; Assistant Professor of Film Studies and Southern Literature, Language and Communication, Northwestern State University of Louisiana), and Laurie Gries (Assistant Professor, English, UF). 1:00–2:30 in Pugh 210. Everyone welcome: RSVP to rosenber@ufl.edu.

11/6/14–11/8/14

2014 Florida Writers Festival, Presented by MFA@FLA. Readings and craft talks by Charles Simic, Kevin Canty, Rivka Galchen, Michael Dickman, and Myla Goldberg.

*Ustler is located near the intersection of E. West Drive and Fletcher Drive, on UF's campus, near Ben Hill Griffin Stadium and the campus infirmary. To reach Ustler, take University, then turn onto Buckman Drive. Parking can be found immediately on Buckman Drive, or you can take Buckman to Stadium, then turn right onto Fletcher and park in the small lot across from the infirmary.

11/17/14

Professor Randall Halle, University of Pittsburgh
Workshop and Public Talk

Monday, November 17, 2014

4:00pm, Pugh Hall 120
Public talk: “Creative Europe: Visual Culture From National to European Style”

Abstract:
Europeanization is a term of social scientific analysis largely ignored by the humanities; moreover, Europeanization has been a term largely associated with economic and political transformations within the expanding EU and not an explicit question of culture. However, with the start of 2014, the new Creative Europe program has come into effect, and it has already had a deep impact on cultural production across the EU and well beyond its borders. The program seeks to harmonize and synergize the cultural and creative sectors across Europe, recognizing them as playing a “big role in the European economy.” This cultural policy produces what we can identify as culture industry 2.0. Thus, attention to the program calls upon both social scientists and humanists to develop new paradigms of understanding European culture.

10:40–12:35am, Ustler 108
Workshop “Researching Film Funding: The European Case”
The hands-on workshop is geared toward graduate students in Film and Media Studies but also open to graduate students in other fields who research the impact of cultural policies as well as interested faculty members and advanced undergraduate students. Please bring your laptops (but no tablets). As seating is limited, please reserve a seat by emailing Barbara Mennel at mennel@ufl.edu by November 1, 2014.

Randall Halle is the Klaus W. Jonas Professor of German Film and Cultural Studies at the University of Pittsburgh. He has published The Europeanization of Cinema: Interzones and Imaginative Communities (2014), German Film after Germany: Toward a Transnational Aesthetic (2008), Queer Social Philosophy: Critical Readings from Kant to Adorno (2004). He has co-edited After the Avant-garde: New Directions in Experimental Film (2008), Light Motives: German Popular Film in Perspective (2003), and Marginality and Alterity in Contemporary European Cinema, and two special volumes of Camera Obscura (2001). The events are funded by the Jean Monnet Chair and the European Union-funded Jean Monnet Centre of Excellence at the University of Florida and the Waldo W. Neikirk Term Professorship.

For questions, please contact Barbara Mennel at mennel@ufl.edu or Amie Kreppel at kreppel@ufl.edu.

Spring 2015

2/19/15

Digital Assembly Spring 2015 Workshop: “Changing the Game”
4:00–7:00pm, Thursday, February 19th, Dauer 215
11:00am–1:00pm, Friday, February 20th, Dauer 215

The Digital Assembly’s Spring 2015 workshop will introduce attendees to contemporary approaches for studying digital games and demo how to design and modify game hardware and software. The workshop will feature presentations by Professor Anastasia Salter (University of Central Florida), Professor Stephanie Boluk (Pratt Institute), and Patrick LeMieux (Duke University) that introduce alternative ways of repurposing digital games. This workshop is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be provided.

2/26/15

E-Poetry Master Class with John Cayley, Professor of Literary Arts, Brown University
5–7 PM, Marston Library Conference & Visualization Room L-136

Celebrated electronic poet and theorist of digital writing John Cayley will lead a virtual e-poetry master class for Terry Harpold and Alin Dobra’s jointly-taught “Data Mining & Digital Poetics” graduate seminar. Speaking remotely from his offices at Brown University, Professor Cayley will discuss the technical and creative arc of his electronic and print poetry and critical writings, and possible futures of computational literary practice, particularly the use of large-scale network transactions to enable—or to inhibit—new writing methods.

The master class, held in the new Marston Library Visualization Room, is open to all UF students and faculty. Seating will be limited; please arrive early. For more information on the master class, including a list of recommended advance readings, contact Terry Harpold. This event is jointly sponsored by the Departments of English and Computer & Information Science and Engineering and the Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere.

2/26/15–2/27/15

James Joyce, Science Fiction, Cultural Studies, and other Modernist Wonders: A Symposium in Honor of R. Brandon Kershner.”

A two-day symposium that will bring together former UF students, major modernist scholars, and other special guests to celebrate the long career and continuing legacy of our colleague, Brandy Kershner. A full schedule of events and participant biographies can be found on the symposium website.

2/26/15–2/28/15

Pedagogy 24 Times Per Second: Film and Media in the Classroom

Join the Graduate Film Studies Group and our guest graduate students, professors, and program directors for a three-day conference exploring the relationship between scholarship and pedagogy in the field of Film and Media Studies. You can meet with us Thursday–Saturday in Pugh 210 to hear presentations and to participate in workshops and roundtable discussions on practical issues related to film and media pedagogy. Keynote speakers Phil Solomon, Lucy Fischer, and Francesco Casetti will cap each day of the conference with presentations in Ustler Hall. Please see the conference webpage for a full schedule of events.

3/12/15

E-Poetry Master Class with Nick Montfort, Associate Professor of Digital Media & Director of The Trope Tank, MIT
4:30–6:30 PM, Marston Library Conference & Visualization Room L-136

Celebrated electronic poet, interactive fiction author and theorist, and computing platform historian Nick Montfort will lead a virtual e-poetry master class for Terry Harpold and Alin Dobra’s jointly-taught “Data Mining & Digital Poetics” graduate seminar. Speaking remotely from the Interrupt 3 digital arts symposium at Brown University, Professor Montfort will discuss the technical and creative arc of his electronic and print poetry and critical writings, and the emergence of new poetic forms by way of small- and large-scale computational practices.

The master class, held in the new Marston Library Visualization Room, is open to all UF students and faculty. Seating will be limited; please arrive early. For more information on the master class, including a list of recommended advance readings, contact Terry Harpold. This event is jointly sponsored by the Departments of English and Computer & Information Science and Engineering and the Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere. 

3/16/2015

“After the Curtain: Post-1989 Fantastic in Poland”
Paweł Frelik (Marie Curie Skłodowska University, Poland)
7:30–9 PM, Pugh Hall 120

A scholar of print and film science fiction, videogames, and postmodern and experimental fiction, Professor Frelik is the co-editor of American Portraits and Self-Portraits (2002), Playing the Universe: Games and Gaming in Science Fiction (2007), and (Mis)Reading America: American Dreams, Fiction and Illusions (2011). He has published widely on postmodern fiction, science fiction, retrofuturism, cyberpunk, and digital cinema and new media.

On March 17, Professor Frelik will also lead a lunchtime seminar on “What Do We Talk About When We Talk About Science Fiction: Genre Systems and Definitions in Central and Eastern Europe.” The seminar will take place in the Marston Science Library Visualization Room (L-136), from noon to 1:30 PM. A light lunch (sandwiches, soda and coffee) will be served. Vegetarian options will be available.

Both events are free and open to the public. For more information see the Science Fiction Working Group WWW site. For access to recommended advance readings and film clips, contact Terry Harpold.

Professor Frelik’s visit to UF is co-sponsored by the UF Center for European Studies, the Department of English, and the Science Fiction Working Group.

3/26/15–3/28/15

17th annual conference of the Marxist Reading Group: Enthusiasm for Revolution. Thursday, March 26th through Saturday, March 28th. Keynote Speakers are Jodi Dean and Eric Cazdyn. Additional information available soon at this page

4/2/15

MarketWise Forum: Careers for Humanities PhDs in University Libraries and University Presses
3:00 pm, Thursday, 2 April, 2015 in room 212 Library West (the Scott Nygren Scholars Studio)

Speakers

Brian Keith, Associate Dean for Administration & Faculty Affairs, George A. Smathers Libraries

Dennis Lloyd, Deputy Director for Sales, Marketing, and Acquisitions, University Press of Florida and Director Designate of the University of Wisconsin Press

Open to the public

Sponsored by the English Department, the School of Music, George A. Smathers Libraries, and the Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere

4/9/15

“Queer cinema and the Spaces of Europe”
Karl Schoonover (University of Warwick) and Rosalind Galt (King’s College London)
Thursday, April 9, 2015, 5:00–7:00pm, Smathers Library East 100

Abstract:
Queer cinema creates worlds. It intervenes in existing debates on the national, transnational and global as well as envisioning new modes of being in the world. This talk will explore how contemporary queer films are imagining Europe, and how dissident gender and sexual identities intersect with persistent questions of European politics, spaces, and identities. It will analyze border-crossing films (e.g. Dvojina, Unveiled, Edge of Heaven), considering how tropes of immigration and mobility articulate sexuality with race, nationality, and marginality within and outside the EU. In interrogating queer European cinema, it will consider both art films (She Male Snails, Wedding Song) and popular genres, such as the lesbian romcom (Stud Life, I Can't Think Straight) and the gay road movie (Parade, Adventures of Felix). By examining a range of cinematic styles and genres, the talk will draw out queer cinema’s richly varied responses to debates on homonationalism, multiculturalism, and queer belonging in today’s Europe.

Bios:
Karl Schoonoveris an Associate Professor of Film Studies at the University of Warwick. He is the author of Brutal Vision: The Neorealist Body in Postwar Italian Cinema (Minnesota UP, 2012), as well as coeditor of the collection Global Art Cinema: New Theories and Histories (Oxford UP, 2010). He has published essays in numerous anthologies and in journals such as Art Journal, Cinema Journal, Framework, and Screen. His research interests include theories of cinematic time, the politics of film style, and the emergence of ‘world cinema’ as an institutional category.

Rosalind Galt is Reader in Film Studies at the King’s College London. She is the author of The New European Cinema: Redrawing the Map (Columbia UP, 2006) and Pretty: Film and the Decorative Image (Columbia UP, 2011), as well as coeditor of the collection Global Art Cinema: New Theories and Histories (Oxford UP, 2010). She has published in journals such as Camera Obscura, Screen, Cinema Journal, and Discourse. Her research interests include the intersections of film theory and aesthetics, postwar world cinemas, and European avant-garde movements.

Funding and contact info:
The lecture is co-sponsered by the Jean Monnet Chair and the European Union-funded Jean Monnet Centre of Excellence at the University of Florida, the Waldo W. Neikirk Term Professorship, and the Center for Women’s Studies and Gender Research. For questions, please contact Barbara Mennel at mennel@ufl.edu or Amie Kreppel at kreppel@ufl.edu.

4/10/15–12/15

The Graduate Comics Organization at the University of Florida will be hosting the 12th annual UF Conference on Comics and Graphic Novels, “Comics Read but Seldom Seen: Diversity and Representation in Comics and Related Media,” from Friday, April 10th, 2015 to Sunday, April 12th, 2015. Panels will be held in Pugh 210, and evening keynotes will be held in the Ustler auditorium. Confirmed guest speakers Sheena C. Howard and Jose Alaniz will be speaking at the event. For more details, please see the conference page.

Summer 2015

7/10/2015

Them! @ FLMNH”
7 PM, Florida Museum of Natural History

The Florida Museum of Natural History will resume its annual “Creative B” summer film series, featuring entertaining science fiction films and roundtable discussions by scholars, scientists, and artists. This summer’s series will kick off on July 10, beginning at 7 PM, with Them!, Gordon Douglas’s 1954 film about giant ants attacking Los Angeles. One of the first nuclear monster films – Ishir? Honda’s Gojira (Godzilla) was released the same year – Them! is the first and best of the “giant insect” films of the 1950s. It features a strong American cast (James Whitmore, Edmund Gwenn, Joan Weldon, and James Arness), a famously unnerving soundtrack, and then state-of-the-art practical effects. Widely considered one of the best sf films of the era, Them! continues to influence sf film today.

The screening will be preceded and followed by a roundtable discussion featuring: American sculptor Susan P. Cochran; Ian Breheny, Museum Operations Specialist at the FLMNH, and co-founder of the film series; Terry Harpold, Associate Professor of English, Film & Media Studies at UF; Tim Lawrence, a Jacksonville-based graphic artist and effects designer with a long history of SFX work in television and major motion pictures; and Andrea Lucky, Assistant Scientist, Department of Entomology and Nematology, UF, and founder of “The School of Ants” project, a citizen-scientist driven study of the ants that live in urban areas. Them! is unrated. Some scenes may be too intense for children. All “Creative B” events are free and open to the public. See the Science Fiction Working Group WWW site <sciencefiction.group.ufl.edu> for more information.

7/15/2015

“Wanderers – An Evening of Contemporary Short Science Fiction Films”
7–8:30 PM
Digital Worlds Institute
Norman Gym, 624 SW 12th Street

The most innovative and perhaps the most influential genres of science fiction film today are not the big-budget Hollywood spectacles playing on the screens of your local Googolplex, but the countless thousands of short films created and distributed on the World Wide Web by small, independent, sometimes one-person, film studios. The capabilities of new, relatively inexpensive desktop animation and film editing software have unleashed the talents of independent sf filmmakers worldwide, and produced original, visually and narratively complex works of arresting beauty and historical significance. The selection of short films we will view were created by teams of filmmakers from nearly a dozen nations. Most were released within the last five years. They are only the edge of an advancing vanguard and represent some of the best work in contemporary sf film.

“Wanderers” is curated and presented by Terry Harpold. All films included in the event are suitable for a general audience. Some films may be too intense for young children. All “Creative B” events are free and open to the public. See the Science Fiction Working Group WWW site <sciencefiction.group.ufl.edu> for more information.

7/24/2015

One Million Years B.C. @ FLMNH”
7 PM, Florida Museum of Natural History

The Florida Museum of Natural History’s “Creative B” summer film series continues in an sf vein, with Don Chaffey’s 1966 dinosaur and cavegirl epic One Million Years B.C. Chaffey’s film, a joint production of Hammer Film Productions and Seven Arts, is celebrated for its stop-motion dinosaurs by legendary animator Ray Harryhausen, in sequences that are still considered among the best practical effects of this kind. Also prominently featured is Welch’s famous fur-trimmed bikini. A publicity still for the film showing Welch in the outfit became one of the most popular pinup posters of the mid-20th century. The event begins at 7 PM. The screening will be preceded and followed by a roundtable discussion featuring Ian Breheny, Museum Operations Specialist at the FLMNH, and co-founder of the film series; Terry Harpold, Associate Professor of English, Film & Media Studies at UF; and Tim Lawrence, a Jacksonville-based graphic artist and effects designer with a long history of SFX work in television and major motion pictures. One Million Years B.C. is unrated. Some scenes may be too intense for young children. All “Creative B” events are free and open to the public. See the Science Fiction Working Group WWW site <sciencefiction.group.ufl.edu> for more information.