Professor Emeritus

Alistair Duckworth has an MA from the University of Edinburgh and an MA and PhD from Johns Hopkins University. He has taught at the University of Virginia and, on summer or visiting appointments, at the University of Edinburgh; Mount Holyoke College.SUNY Buffalo; UNO Innsbruck; FSU Florence; and FSU London; He joined the UF faculty in 1973. In 1998 Professor Duckworth was designated the T. Walter Herbert Commemorative Term Professor, and in 1999 he received a SAADE Outstanding Teacher Award. He retired from UF in 2003 and has been employed since by FSU in London and Florence.

Professor Duckworth was a Guggenheim Fellow in 1978 and a visiting fellow at Magdalen College, Oxford, in 1988. He has published more than 100 essays and reviews on English fiction and the relations between literature and landscape. His The Improvement of the Estate: A Study of Jane Austen’s Novels (Johns Hopkins UP, 1971) was reissued in paperback with a new introduction in 1994. Other books are “Howards End”: E. M. Forster’s House of Fiction(1992) and (with David C. Streatfield) Landscapes in the Gardens and the Literature of Eighteenth-Century (1981). Bedford Books/ St Martin’s Press published his case-study edition of Forster’s Howards End (1997) and his case-study edition of Austen’s Emma.  (2002).

Professor Duckworth has served on the Editorial Board of the Cambridge UP edition of Jane Austen’s Works, (9 vols, 2005–07). He has lectured on Jane Austen at the University of Bologna, Goldsmith’s College of the University of London, the University of Lincoln, the University of Aberdeen, and the Scottish Branch of the Jane Austen Society.

Contact

Professor Emeritus

Bernard J. Paris

Bernard J. Paris (ret. 1996) received his PhD from The Johns Hopkins University in 1959 and taught at Lehigh University, Michigan State University, and the University of Florida. His primary areas of interest have been, in the order of their emergence, Victorian and comparative fiction, the psychological study of literature, Shakespeare, and the life and work of Karen Horney and her place in the history of psychoanalysis. He has received NEH and Guggenheim Fellowships and has been Visiting Professor at the Victorian Studies Centre of the University of Leicester.

His first book, Experiments in Life: George Eliot’s Quest for Values(1965) reflected his training in thematic analysis and the history of ideas. His subsequent work in literary criticism has been devoted to the development of a psychological approach to literature based on the theories of Karen Horney and other Third Force or Humanistic Psychologists, particularly Abraham Maslow. He has written seven books applying this approach to a variety of texts and critical issues: A Psychological Approach to Fiction: Studies in Thackeray, Stendhal, George Eliot, Dostoevsky, and Conrad (1974); Character and Conflict in Jane Austen’s Novels (1978); Bargains with Fate: Psychological Crises and Conflicts in Shakespeare and His Plays (1991); Character as a Subversive Force in Shakespeare: The History and the Roman Plays (1991); Imagined Human Beings: A Psychological Approach to Character and Conflict in Literature (1997); Rereading George Eliot: Changing Perspectives on Her Experiments in Life (2003); and Conrad’s Charlie Marlow: A New Approach to Heart of Darkness and Lord Jim (2005). He also edited Third Force Psychology and the Study of Literature (1986). Bargains With Fate and Imagined Human Beingshave been translated into Chinese. Four of the above-mentioned books are out ofprint but are available in electronic form via links from Professor Paris’s personal website, as are several essays and some chapters from Imagined Human Beings.

In addition to his work in literary criticism, he has written a biographical study, Karen Horney: A Psychoanalyst’s Search for Self-Understanding (1994; selected as a Notable Book by The New York Times, and since translated into German and Chinese.) In this book, he explores the relationship between Horney’s personal history and the evolution of her psychoanalytic ideas. He also tries to present a thorough account of her thought, to place it in relation to the history of psychoanalysis, and to make a case for its enduring power and importance. In the course of his research for the book, he discovered a number of unpublished essays and lectures by Horney, and edited these and her uncollected writings in two volumes for Yale University Press: The Therapeutic Process: Essays and Lectures (1999) and The Unknown Karen Horney: Essays on Gender, Culture, and Psychoanalysis (2000). In the early 1990s, he founded the International Karen Horney Society (IKHS), of which he is Director.

His 2003 study of George Eliot traces his shifting responses to her fiction over the years and uses himself as a case history to study the psychology of reader response. He also provides close readings of Middlemarch and Daniel Deronda, which many think to be her masterpieces. He was a true believer in her Religion of Humanity when he wrote Experiments in Life, but now strongly disagrees with her values and with her interpretations and judgments of her characters. But, he concludes, “she is a far greater genius than I realized back then in the creation of psychological portraits of imagined human beings.”

He is presently working on a new project, Dostoevsky’s Greatest Characters: Notes From Underground, Crime And Punishment, and The Brothers Karamazov.

Contact

Professor Emeritus
Professor David Leverenz received his AB from Harvard in 1964 and his PhD from Berkeley in 1969. He joined the UF faculty in 1985, after teaching at Rutgers University for sixteen years and chairing the Livingston College English Department from 1975 to 1980.

He is the author of The Language of Puritan Feeling (Rutgers UP, 1980), Manhood and the American Renaissance (Cornell UP, 1989), Paternalism Incorporated: Fables of American Fatherhood, 1865–1940 (Cornell UP, 2003), and Honor Bound: Race and Shame in America (Rutgers UP, 2012). He has also co-edited Mindful Pleasures, a collection of essays on Thomas Pynchon (Little, Brown, 1976). He has published over twenty-five essays and articles, primarily on 19th century American literature,in such journals as American Literary HistorySignsCollege EnglishPMLASouthwest Review, and Criticism.

Contact

Albert Brick Professor

My most recent book, Victorian Skin: Surface, Self, History, focuses on the history of the body, medicine and realism in the nineteenth century, with special attention to skin and surface. This is an extension of my long-term work on the history of the body and medicine in the period, and on the history of genre. Other areas of interest include gender, popular literature and medical humanities. Some recent article publications include “Dreadful: Aesthetic Fear in Victorian Reading” in Dreadful Passions: Fear in the Literary and Medical Imagination Medieval to Modern; “How Disgust Entered the Ghost Story,” Routledge Handbook to the Ghost Story, (Scott Brewster and Luke Thurston, eds. London: Routledge, 2018: 409-417), “The Will to Touch: David Copperfield’s Hand.” 19: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Long Nineteenth Century (November 2014), and the coedited Encyclopedia of Victorian Literature in four volumes, Blackwell, 2015 (Coedited with Dino Felluga and Linda Hughes), which won the “Outstanding Reference Book” designation from the American Library Association, January 2016. I was a John Simon Guggenheim Fellow (2016) and Society for the Humanities Fellow at Cornell (2016-17).

I am on the executive committee for NAVSA (the North American Victorian Studies Association), and am organizing the 2018 conference in St. Petersburg, Florida. I also serve as elected representative on the Forum LLC Victorian and Early-20th-Century English group for the MLA (Modern Language Association) and on several editorial boards. I am the series editor for the SUNY Press book series Studies in the Long Nineteenth Century. At UF, I am affiliated with the Center for Women’s and Gender Studies and am a founding member of CISMaC, the Collective for the Interdisciplinary Study of Medicine and Culture. I regularly teach courses in Victorian Literature, Literature and Medicine, and topics in Victorian Gender and Class.

Professor Gilbert’s CV

Contact

  • office: Turlington Hall 4008-D
  • voice: (352) 294-2828
  • fax: (352) 392-0860
  • email: <pgilbert@ufl.edu>
Professor

Kenneth Kidd

Kenneth Kidd works in Anglophone children’s literature studies and is especially interested in the field’s intersections with other cultural projects, such as philosophy, psychology, and critical theory. His current book project, under contract with Fordham UP, looks at children’s literature’s engagement with and presence inside theory and philosophy and is called Theory for Beginners, or Children’s Literature Otherwise. It’s a sequel of sorts to his second book, Freud in Oz (Minnesota, 2011), about the intersections of children’s literature and psychoanalysis. He is also interested in questions of gender and sexuality in and around children’s literature. His first book, Making American Boys (Minnesota, 2004), explores literary and cultural programs of “boyology” in relation to stories of boys raised by various animals (what he calls the “feral tale”). He has also coedited two essay collections dealing with queer childhood and/or children’s literature: Over the Rainbow (Michigan, 2004), and the forthcoming Queer as Camp: Essays in Summer, Style, and Sexuality, also with Fordham UP. With UF colleague Sid Dobrin he also coedited the first essay collection on children’s literature and ecocriticism, Wild Things (Wayne State, 2004), and with Joseph T. Thomas, Jr. he coedited Prizing Children’s Literature: The Cultural Politics of Children’s Book Awards (Routledge, 2017).

Professor Kidd serves on a number of editorial boards and is especially active with the Children’s Literature Association. He is coeditor of the third volume of the Cambridge History of Children’s Literature, now in preparation, and with Elizabeth Marshall he co-edits the Children’s Literature and Culture series at Routledge, the oldest-running monograph series in the field. At UF he is part of the Baldwin Editorial Collective, now working on a book showcasing the Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature. Professor Kidd teaches undergraduate courses in children’s and young adult literature, including a new course on Florida children’s literature, as well as graduate seminars such as “Into the Archive,” “Comparative Children’s Literature” and “Disney and Its Discontents.” He is an Affiliate Professor with the Center for Women’s Studies and Gender Research and also serves as Associate Director of UF’s Center for the Study of Children’s Literature & Culture.

Professor Kidd’s CV

Contact

Professor

Malini Johar Schueller

I have just finished working on a book on how suitable pedagogical subjects, through schooling, emerged as a central biopolitical technology of power that was deployed in the materially different circumstances of the colonization of the Philippines and that of occupation Japan. Engaging with an archive of state-sanctioned proclamations, educational agendas, school textbooks, novels, short stories, film, and political cartoons I critically juxtapose two connected sites and two distinct temporalities to offer a new way of assessing U.S. empire in the first half of the twentieth century, one that argues that colonialism and occupation are linked vis-à-vis the assimilative production of “knowledgeable” subjects. The book, Campaigns of Knowledge: Pedagogies of U.S. Colonialism and Occupation in the Philippines and Japan (Forthcoming, Temple University Press), brings together the fields of American cultural studies, postcolonial studies, Asian American studies and transpacific studies.

Two recent invited talks that exemplify the breadth of my engagement with US empire studies and race studies are my response to current scholars writing about the “Barbary” states in a conference titled “America and Muslim Worlds” sponsored by the McNeil Center for Early American Studies and my lecture, “‘You taught me language’: Education, Racialization and forms of US imperial Governmentality” which was part of the Eminent Scholar Lecture Series at the University of Alabama. Three publications that are representative of my research are U.S. Orientalisms: Race, Nation and Gender in Literature, 1790-1890, “Decolonizing Global Theories Today: Hardt and Negri, Agamben, Butler,” “Colonial Management, Collaborative Dissent: English Readers in the Philippines and Camilo Osias, 1905-1932.” I have also directed a documentary, In His Own Home, about the police shooting of an African student on the UF campus. I am the undergraduate coordinator of the minor in Asian American studies and faculty advisor for Students for Justice in Palestine (SJP) and Sparks Magazine. Three courses I have taught recently are “Cultures of US Imperialism,” “Comparative Settler Colonialism,” and “Race, Empire, and Asian American Studies.”

Professor Schueller’s CV

Professor Schueller’s website

Contact

  • office: Turlington Hall 4113
  • voice: (352) 294-2812
  • fax: (352) 392-0860
  • email: <malini@ufl.edu>
Professor/University Term Professor 2018-20

After attending the Haystack Writing Workshop with Ursula K. Le Guin, I took my PhD from UC Berkeley in 1990; my current projects include a critical examination of literary “success” in America, a sequence of novels, including STILL ICE which won a UF Rothman Summer Grant, the first chapter of which was published online at EMBARK: A LITERARY JOURNAL FOR NOVELISTS. I am the author of: THE WARPAINT TRILOGY (2012-14) from which I have recently given several readings, and an academic talk about combining creative and academic careers; also SF novel OTHER NATURE (TOR/FORGE, 1995); THE-BOY-WHO-WAS-THROWN-AWAY and SNOW-EYES (Atheneum/DAW 1985/87); short stories in New Letters, Asimov’s, and SF&F. I have held fiction residencies at the Writer’s Colony, the VCCA, Noepe Center for the Arts, Hedgebrook, Norcroft, Provincetown and Dorland. I was an NEH Scholar at UCLA, also the author of Conceived By Liberty (Cornell 1995) which was short-listed for the MLA first book prize, and Household Words (Minnesota, 2006).

Currently, I am an SF/F reviewer for Kirkus and I’m on the Advisory Board for Feminist Studies; my essays appear in American Literature, Genders, Genre and Differences; I am an affiliate at the CGSWSR, AAS, CES and have served the Harn Museum as a fiction/poetry judge for their annual student contest. Most frequently I teach 19thC American Literature, courses on Melville, James, Wharton and Plath or Critical Theory, particularly queer and feminist theory.

Professor Smith’s CV

Contact

Professor Emeritus
Chris Snodgrass received his BA from Wabash College, and his MA and PhD from SUNY-Buffalo. Most of his scholarly research has focused on late Victorian literature and art, particularly the 1890s, touching on intellectual history and cultural studies. He has published numerous articles on figures such as Carlyle, Swinburne, Wilde, Dowson, Symons, and Beardsley, among others. He is the author of Aubrey Beardsley, Dandy of the Grotesque (Oxford UP, 1995), which was named by the CHOICE library service as one of the “outstanding academic books of 1995.”

Professor Snodgrass is currently writing a second book on Beardsley (and fin-de-sièclesexuality), provisionally titled Elegant Monsters: Aubrey Beardsley and Late-Victorian Narratives of Sexuality.

Among his recent graduate seminars have been “Movements in Victorian Literature and Art: Aestheticism and the Decadence,” “Sexual Identity and Representation in Late Victorian Literature and Art,” “Issues in Victorian Culture: The Woman Question in the Fin de Siècle,” and “Theorizing Decadence: Images of Men, Women, and Other Monsters in Late-Victorian Mythologies.” He served for eight years as the chief negotiator for collective bargaining contracts on behalf of Florida’s state university faculty.

Contact

Assistant Professor

Rae X. Yan is an Assistant Professor of British Literature from 1830 to 1900 at the University of Florida. She is currently at work on a book project about anatomizing as a joint literary and scientific practice during the Victorian era, tentatively titled The Human Frame: Anatomy, Literature, and Form in the Victorian Era. She pursued her PhD in English at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she also received a certificate in digital humanities.

Dr. Yan’s larger interdisciplinary research lies at the intersections of the Victorian novel, literature and science studies, and Sino-British relations. Recently, she has given talks at the Victorian Popular Fiction Association conference on Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu’s Carmilla; the North American Victorian Studies Association conference on Robert Louis Stevenson’s short story The Body Snatcher; and at the Interdisciplinary Nineteenth Century Studies conference on philosophical anatomy. Her published articles include “Robert Louis Stevenson as Philosophical Anatomist: The Body Snatcher” in English Literature in Transition, 1880-1920 and “Dickens’s Wild Child: Nurture and Discipline after Peter the Wild Boy” in Dickens Studies Annual. At the University of Florida, Dr. Yan teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in Victorian literature, the nineteenth-century novel, literature and science, Golden Age children’s literature, and narrative video games.

Professor Yan’s CV

Contact