Professor Emeritus

Ronald Carpenter received his PhD in Communication Arts from the University of Wisconsin, where his doctoral focus was rhetorical theory — particularly the canon of style in written discourse. He is the author of several books, including: The Eloquence of Frederick Jackson Turner (1983), History as Rhetoric: Style, Narrative, and Persuasion (1995), Father Charles E. Coughlin: Surrogate Spokesman for the Disaffected (1998), Rhetoric in Martial Deliberations and Decision Making: Cases and Consequences (2004), and co-author of Douglas MacArthur: Warrior as Wordsmith (1997). His many scholarly publications include book chapters in anthologies and research articles in journals such as Communication Monographs, Language and Style, Huntington Library Quarterly, Naval History, Communication Quarterly, Style, Presidential Studies Quarterly, U.S. Naval Institute Proceedings, Communication Studies, The Quarterly Journal of Speech, Marine Corps Gazette, and Army History. He also published a writing textbook, Choosing Powerful Words: Eloquence that Works (1999).

Professor Carpenter’s awards for scholarship and teaching include the National Communication Association Douglas Ehninger Distinguished Rhetorical Scholar Award (2004) and a Golden Anniversary Monograph Prize for Outstanding Scholarship (1984), the Southern States Communication Association Teacher-Scholar Award (1999), the endowed Giles Wilkeson Gray Lectureship at Louisiana State University (2001), listing in Communication Education as among the “Top 3% of Active Prolific Scholars in Communication Studies” (1993), and a University of Florida College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Outstanding Teacher Award (2001–2002) for his upper-division courses in rhetoric and composition. As a consultant, his “Write Well – Right Now” workshop-seminar is presented frequently for diverse groups including corporate executives, public relations professionals, public defenders, CPAs, speechwriters, judges, English teachers, incoming classes of officers at the U.S. Naval War College, and the California Bar Association.

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Professor Emeritus

Ira Clark (BA, New Mexico State University, 1962; PhD, Northwestern University, 1966) came to UF in 1972, after teaching at The Johns Hopkins University. He has published essays primarily on Christian and classical contexts of English Renaissance literature, culminating in Christ Revealed: The History of the Neotypological Lyric in the English Renaissance (1982) and a series of articles on Milton. He is also interested in style and the period’s reflection of social and political conditions in plays: Professional Playwrights: Massinger, Ford, Shirley, and Brome (1992), The Moral Art of Philip Massinger (1993), and Comedy, Youth, Manhood in Early Modern England (2003).

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Distinguished Professor Emerita

Patricia Craddock

Patricia Craddock is the author or editor of four books and many articles on Edward Gibbon, author of The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, including a two-volume biography, Young Edward Gibbon: Gentleman of Letters (1982) and Edward Gibbon: “Luminous” Historian (1989).

Her work has been supported by a Guggenheim Fellowship, two NEH senior fellowships, an ACLS grant-in-aid, and a fellowship at the Institute for Advanced Study (Princeton). She is the 1997–98 Catherine and Herbert Yardley Professor at the University of Florida. Formerly chair of the Department of English at Boston University, she came to the University of Florida as Professor and Chair of English in 1988 and served as chair until 1994. She has taught also at the University of Montevallo, Connecticut College, and Goucher College, and as a visiting professor at M.I.T.

As editor of Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture, she published two of the annual volumes of that journal, and she has served on the editorial boards of South Atlantic Review (1996–98),The Age of Johnson (1992–present), and the Georgia Smollett edition (1997–present). She has served as English Book Review editor of The Eighteenth Century: A Current Bibliography, the standard interdisciplinary bibliography in eighteenth-century studies.

Professor Craddock’s interests include children’s literature, nineteenth-century fiction and narrative theory in general, and Victorian literature, as well as all aspects of eighteenth-century British culture.  She is pursuing a book on The Historical Art of Edward Gibbon, and preparing an online  edition of the The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire.

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Professor

John Cech’s recent research involves a documentary history of children’s literature that makes use of the University of Florida’s premier collection of children’s books, The Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature. In 2017, Cech provided the Afterword for a new edition of D’Aulaire’s Greek Myths, and he gave the Edward G. Holley Memorial Lecture at the annual conference of the American Library Association on “History, Creativity, and Children’s Literature.” Cech is the author of Angels and Wild Things, The Archetypal Poetics of Maurice Sendak; Imagination and Innovation, The Story of Weston Woods; and a series of picture-book retellings, with historical notes, of classic fairy tales. Cech directs the interdisciplinary Center for Children’s Literature and Culture. He serves on the advisory board of the International Children’s Media Center, and he was the recipient of the Anne Devereaux Jordan award for his contributions as a scholar and as a public intellectual in the field of children’s literature. Among Cech’s recent courses are graduate seminars in The Art and Legacy of Maurice Sendak; Childhood, Culture, and Creativity; and Childhood and its Poetics.

Professor Cech’s CV

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Professor
Fiction
Jill Ciment
Photo: Arnold Mesches

Jill Ciment teaches graduate and undergraduate creative writing workshops. She is the author of Small Claims, a collection of short stories and novellas; The Law of Falling Bodies, Teeth of the Dog, The Tattoo Artist, Heroic Measures (a finalist for the Los Angeles Book Prize), Act of God, and The Body in Question, novels; and Half a Life, a memoir. She is also the co-author (with Amy Hempel) of the thriller, The Hand That Feeds You. She has been awarded a National Endowment for the Arts, a NEA Japan Fellowship Prize, two New York State Fellowships for the Arts, the Janet Heidinger Kafka Prize, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. 5 Flights Up, a film adaptation of Heroic Measures, was released in 2015.

Professor Ciment’s CV

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