Professor Emeritus
Professor David Leverenz received his AB from Harvard in 1964 and his PhD from Berkeley in 1969. He joined the UF faculty in 1985, after teaching at Rutgers University for sixteen years and chairing the Livingston College English Department from 1975 to 1980.

He is the author of The Language of Puritan Feeling (Rutgers UP, 1980), Manhood and the American Renaissance (Cornell UP, 1989), Paternalism Incorporated: Fables of American Fatherhood, 1865–1940 (Cornell UP, 2003), and Honor Bound: Race and Shame in America (Rutgers UP, 2012). He has also co-edited Mindful Pleasures, a collection of essays on Thomas Pynchon (Little, Brown, 1976). He has published over twenty-five essays and articles, primarily on 19th century American literature,in such journals as American Literary HistorySignsCollege EnglishPMLASouthwest Review, and Criticism.

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Associate Professor
Amoko’s new book project examines the deployment of sexuality in late colonial and postcolonial African literature and the figuration of the father as the embodiment of an increasingly beleaguered patriarchal tradition. Following Judith Butler, the book examines gender trouble in the postcolony. In addition to his book Postcolonialism in the Wake of the Nairobi Revolution, Amoko has contributed to The Routledge Companion to Critical Theory and The Cambridge Companion to African Literature.

Amoko’s work has also appeared in the journals Modern Drama, Callaloo, and Mosaic. His teaching interests are postcolonial theory and literatures, critical theory, cultural studies, ethnic literatures of Canada and the United States, and modern drama.

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Professor

Presently, I am editing a volume on African American Film (at press), finishing a book on Afro-European Cinema and Culture, and working on a book about gender and sexuality in recent African American Film. During the 2017 summer, I presented “Barry Jenkins’ Moonlight (2016): Urban Sexual Blues as Fluid Agency” at the 34th International Conference on Psychology and the Arts in Palermo, Sicily. See my CV below for a complete list of my publications.

I take part in the Modern Language Association where I have held two delegate positions. I am a member of the Collegium for African American Research and the Psychology and the Arts organization. I hold two editorial board positions on the film journals Jump Cut and Screening Noir and have read manuscripts for such presses as MacMillan-Palgrave, Wallflower, SUNY, Cambridge, and most recently the Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Criminology and Criminal Justice. My University of Florida affiliations include the African American Studies Program, the Center for African Studies, and the Center for European Studies. I teach such courses as Black Drama, The World of James Baldwin and Critical Race Theory, Afro-European Literature and Culture, and The Harlem Renaissance.

Professor Reid’s CV

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  • office: Turlington Hall 4318
  • voice: (352) 294-2827
  • fax: (352) 392-0860
  • email: <reid@ufl.edu>
Associate Professor, Graduate Coordinator

Schorb’s work explores the intersections of print culture and self-making in the Americas across the seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Her book, Reading Prisoners: Literature, Literacy, and the Transformation of American Punishment, 1700–1845 (Rutgers UP, 2014), demonstrates the emergence of the prisoner as writer and merges the history of the US prison, literacy, and print. She is currently at work on a book that argues the connections between early life writing and emerging sexual epistemologies.

She is affiliate faculty in the Center for Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies Research and Convener of the Mellon Intersections Group on Mass Incarcerations through the Center for the Humanities in the Public Sphere. She is an active member of the Society of Early Americanists and the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies. Schorb was awarded Professor of the Year for Graduate Students from the Graduate Student Council (2013) and Teacher of the Year from CLAS (2011).

Recent publications include “Captivity Recast,” in Blackwell Companion to American Literature (2018); the scholarly introduction to Herman Mann’s The Female Review, “Mann Seeking Woman” for the Just Teach One Project, in Common-Place: The Journal of Early American Life (2016); and “Hard-Hearted Women: Sentiment and the Scaffold,” Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers (2011). Reviews of her work have appeared in American Studies, American Literary History, Journal of American History, and elsewhere. She has served as outside reviewer for GLQ, William and Mary Quarterly, Journal of the History of Sexuality, and the Journal of Lesbian Studies.

Prospective graduate students may be interested in sample recent seminars, including “The Carceral Imaginary: Prison History, Literature, Theory” (Spring 2019); “Sexing the Past”: Theory and History of Early Modern Gender and Sexuality (Spring 2018); “Corporeal Sensorium”: Affect, Taste, and Aesthetic Feeling in Early American Literature (Spring 2016); and “Life Writing and Self-Making in American Literature to 1820” (Spring 2013); archived course descriptions are available on the Department of English’s “Courses” page.

Professor Schorb’s CV

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  • office: Turlington Hall 4334
  • voice: (352) 294-2875
  • fax: (352) 392-0860
  • email: <jschorb@ufl.edu>
Assistant Professor

Delia is currently working on a book project that seeks to formulate a methodological approach to reading African American literature through a Critical Disability Studies lens. Recently, she was awarded a Rothman Faculty Fellowship, where she traveled to Ohio to conduct archival research for her upcoming biography of the late African American author, Delores Phillips. Delia has presented her research in conferences both nationally and internationally, including Canada, Scotland, England, and most recently, Greece, where she gave a talk entitled “Geographical Landscapes as Markers of Citizenship and Racial Belonging in Adrienne Kennedy’s The Ohio State Murders.” Her most recent publications include: “Madness, Melancholia, and Suicide in Sue Monk Kidd’s The Secret Life of Bees” in The South Carolina Review, “Everything Gray’”: Polygenism and Racial Perception in Herman Melville’s ‘Benito Cereno’” in The Journal of American Culture, and “Zora Neale Hurston’s Radical Racial Politics in Jonah’s Gourd Vine” in The Explicator.

Delia is an affiliate professor with African American Studies and Women and Gender Studies. She offers undergraduate courses such as “The Black Subject in 19th Century American Literature and Culture,” “Disability, Narratives, and the Black Body,” and “African American Literature I,” as well as graduate courses on Critical Disability Studies, Gender and Sexualities in African American Literature, and Slave Narratives and Neo-Slave Narratives. She recently received a grant from the Center for the Study of Race and Race Relations to co-teach a course on Race and Disability in US History and Literature.

Professor Steverson’s CV

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  • office: Turlington Hall 4354
  • voice: (352) 294-2854
  • fax: (352) 392-0860
  • email: <dsteverson@ufl.edu>
Professor

Professor Turim’s current book project, titled Desire and its Ends: The Driving Forces of Recent Cinema, Literature, and Art, will look at the different ways desire structures narratives and images in various cultural traditions, and the way our very notion of desire may be shaped by these representations. Turim is author of Abstraction in Avant-Garde Films, Flashbacks in Film: Memory and History, and The Films of Oshima: Images of a Japanese Iconoclast. She has published over one hundred essays in anthologies and journals on a wide range of theoretical, historical and aesthetic issues in cinema and video, art, cultural studies, feminist and psychoanalytic theory, and comparative literature.

Several of Professor Turim’s essays have appeared in translation in French and German. She has also written catalogue essays for museum exhibitions.

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  • office: Turlington Hall 4330
  • voice: (352) 294-2835
  • fax: (352) 392-0860
  • email: <mturim@ufl.edu>