Professor

Donald Ault (PhD, 1968, University of Chicago) taught at the University of California, Berkeley, and at Vanderbilt University before coming to Florida in 1988. In 1972–74 Professor Ault initiated curriculum changes at Berkeley by creating English 176 (“Literature and Popular Culture”) and English 177 (“Literature and Philosophy”). At UF he taught courses in Romanticism, in comics, animation, and movie serials, in literary theory, in William Blake, and in literature and science.

Professor Ault wrote Visionary Physics: Blake’s Response to Newton (1974) and Narrative Unbound: Re-Visioning William Blake’s The Four Zoas (1987), co-edited Critical Paths: Blake and the Argument of Method (1987), and edited Carl Barks: Conversations (2003). He served as consultant and contributor to The Carl Barks Library of Walt Disney’s Donald Duck and Uncle Scrooge (1983–90) and The Barks Library in Color (1992–98). His work appeared in journals such as Studies in RomanticismModern PhilologyEighteenth-Century StudiesThe Wordsworth CircleThe Keats-Shelley Journal, and The Comics Journal, as well as in various essay collections, including Comics & Culture: Analytical and Theoretical Approaches to Comics (2000). Professor Ault was executive producer and editorial supervisor for the videotape production The Duck Man: An Interview with Carl Barks (1996). A new and expanded version of his first book (Visionary Physics and Other Essays: Blake Newton, and Incommensurable Textuality ) appeared in 2003.

With the help of UF students, especially John F. Ronan, Professor Ault organized the first two annual installments of “University of Florida Conference on Comics and Graphic Novels” – “The Will Eisner Symposium” (2002) and “Underground(s)” (2003). He  was Founder and Editor Emeritus of the Department’s open access journal ImageTexT, dedicated to the interdisciplinary study of comics and related media.

Professor Emerita

Debora Greger

Debora Greger has published eight books of poetry: Movable Islands (1980), And (1985), The 1002nd Night (1990), Off-Season at the Edge of the World (1994), Desert Fathers, Uranium Daughters (1996), God (2001), Western Art (2004) and Men, Women, and Ghosts (2008). She has won the Grolier Prize, a Discovery/The Nation Award, the Award in Literature from the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters, the Peter I. B. Lavan Younger Poets Award, and the Brandeis University Award in Poetry. She was a winner of the Amy Lowell Poetry Traveling Scholarship and has received grants from the Ingram Merrill Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Guggenheim Foundation.

Professor Greger has been a fellow at the Bunting Institute (Radcliffe) and the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown. She teaches poetry workshops and seminars in poetry. Her degrees are from the University of Washington (BA, 1971) and the University of Iowa (MFA, 1974). She joined UF in 1988, after teaching at George Mason University and California State University, Chico. She has been a visiting professor at Ohio University; Wichita State University; Boise State University; and California State University, Fresno.

Contact

  • office: Turlington Hall 4211F
  • voice: (352) 392-6650, ext. 237
  • fax: (352) 392-0860
  • email: <dgreger@english.ufl.edu>

Professor Emeritus

R. Brandon KershnerR. Brandon Kershner received his MA from The Johns Hopkins Writing Seminars in 1966 and his PhD in English and Comparative Literature from Stanford University in 1972. He has been a member of the UF faculty since 1971.

He is the author of Dylan Thomas: The Poet and His Critics(1977); Joyce, Bakhtin, and Popular Literature (UNC Press, 1989), which won the 1990 award in literary criticism from the American Conference for Irish Studies; The Twentieth-Century Novel: An Introduction (Bedford Books, 1997); and numerous articles on Joyce, other modern writers, and topics within cultural studies. He is the editor of the critical edition of Joyce’s Portrait of the Artist from Bedford Books of St. Martin’s Press (1992), and two collections of essays on Joyce: Joyce and Popular Culture (UF Press, 1996) and Cultural Studies of Joyce (Rodopi, 2003). His poetry and translations have appeared in such journals as Poetry and APR.

Professor Kershner is serving a six-year term as a Trustee of the International James Joyce Foundation, and in 1999 was named University of Florida Alumni Professor of English.

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Professor & Distinguished Teaching Scholar

My current project explores new pedagogies for modernist studies, drawing on my UF courses and cross-campus collaborations. The materials it engages include literature, film, archives, and artworks. With my frequent collaborator Mary Ann Eaverly (UF Classics), I’ve published a new essay on museum pedagogy in the anthology The Classics in Modernist Translation. My other recent essays include “Gentry Modernism,” which examines an upscale men’s fashion magazine alongside cultural connoisseurship in midcentury America. I also do crossover writing, including a piece on Tupperware culture for The Conversation, “From Slag to Swag.” You can find my blog here.

I am active in the Modernist Studies Association, and have contributed to its affiliate journal Modernism/modernity. I also serve on the editorial board of Contemporary Women’s Writing. On the UF campus, I work with the interdisciplinary project Impact of Materials on Society (IMOS), and collaborate frequently with the Harn Museum of Art. I have co-led the recent workshops “Team Teaching from Classroom to Gallery” and “Teaching with Archives: A 360⁰ Event.” I enjoy teaching a variety of undergraduate and graduate classes, which include Desperate Domesticity: The American 1950s, Modern British Poetry, and PostPunk Cultures: The British 1980s. I received a UF Doctoral Mentoring Award in 2018.

Professor Bryant’s CV

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Professor

Michael Hofmann writes, reviews, translates, and teaches. He is currently a judge for the 2018 International MAN Booker Prize, and is preparing the Clarendon Lectures, which he will deliver at the end of the year in Oxford. His translation of Alfred Doblin’s Berlin Alexanderplatz is due out in March from the NYRB Classics series; another translation, of Hans Fallada’s Little Man, What Now? appears later this year from Penguin in England, as does a new book of his poems, One Lark, One Horse (with Faber).

Hofmann publishes reviews and essays in the London Review of Books, New York Review of Books, the New York Times Book Review, and Poetry. His pieces have been collected in two books, Behind the Lines and Where Have You Been? He also teaches graduate and undergraduate poetry workshops and an undergraduate course in Creative Non-Fiction.

Michael Hofmann’s CV

Contact

  • office: Turlington Hall 4211D
  • voice: (352) 294-2879
  • fax: (352) 392-0860
  • email: <mhofmann@ufl.edu>
Alumni Professor and Distinguished Teaching Scholar

William Logan

William Logan writes poetry and a little criticism. His most recent books are Rift of Light (poems, Penguin) and, coming in April, Dickinson’s Nerves, Frost’s Woods (essays, Columbia University Press).

His reviews, when there are reviews, appear in the New York Times Book Review, the New Criterion, Poetry, Hudson Review, Hopkins Review, and other journals. He teaches poetry workshops and the occasional graduate course in the craft of poetry.

Logan received the National Book Critics Circle Award in Criticism, the Aiken Taylor Award in Modern American Poetry, the Staige D. Blackford Prize for Nonfiction, the inaugural Randall Jarrell Award in Poetry Criticism, the Corrington Medal for Literary Excellence, and the Allen Tate Prize.

Professor Logan’s CV

Contact

  • office: Turlington Hall 4211H
  • voice: (352) 294-2883
  • fax: (352) 392-0860
  • email: < wlogan@ufl.edu>
Associate Professor
Creative Writing (Poetry)

I am the author of five collections of poetry, and my most recent book is Distant Mandate (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 2017). I also publish criticism regularly in The London Review of Books, The New York Review of Books, and Poetry magazine. I teach Advanced Verse Writing, and Verse Forms to upper-division undergraduates and MFA students.

Professor Mlinko’s CV

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Professor

Robert Ray is the author of A Certain Tendency of the Hollywood Cinema, 1930–1980 (Princeton University Press); The Avant-Garde Finds Andy Hardy (Harvard University Press); How a Film Theory Got Lost, and Other Mysteries in Cultural Studies (Indiana University Press); and The ABCs of Classic Hollywood (Oxford University Press).

He teaches courses in film studies, contemporary criticism, and intellectual history, with a particular interest in experimental critical practice. He holds a PhD from Indiana University, an MBA from Harvard, a JD from the University of Virginia, and an AB from Princeton.

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Professor Emeritus
Chris Snodgrass received his BA from Wabash College, and his MA and PhD from SUNY-Buffalo. Most of his scholarly research has focused on late Victorian literature and art, particularly the 1890s, touching on intellectual history and cultural studies. He has published numerous articles on figures such as Carlyle, Swinburne, Wilde, Dowson, Symons, and Beardsley, among others. He is the author of Aubrey Beardsley, Dandy of the Grotesque (Oxford UP, 1995), which was named by the CHOICE library service as one of the “outstanding academic books of 1995.”

Professor Snodgrass is currently writing a second book on Beardsley (and fin-de-sièclesexuality), provisionally titled Elegant Monsters: Aubrey Beardsley and Late-Victorian Narratives of Sexuality.

Among his recent graduate seminars have been “Movements in Victorian Literature and Art: Aestheticism and the Decadence,” “Sexual Identity and Representation in Late Victorian Literature and Art,” “Issues in Victorian Culture: The Woman Question in the Fin de Siècle,” and “Theorizing Decadence: Images of Men, Women, and Other Monsters in Late-Victorian Mythologies.” He served for eight years as the chief negotiator for collective bargaining contracts on behalf of Florida’s state university faculty.

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Professor Emerita
Sidney Wade
Photo: Marion Ettlinger

Sidney Wade is the author of six collections of poetry: Straits & Narrows (2013), Stroke (2008), Celestial Bodies (2002), Empty Sleeves (1990); Green (1998); and Istanbul’dan/From Istanbul(1998), which was published in Turkish and English by Yapi Kredi Yayinlari, Istanbul.

Professor Wade is the poetry editor of Subtropics. She served as President of the Association of Writers and Writing Programs(AWP) from 2006–2007.

She has a PhD in English from the University of Houston (1994), an MEd in Counseling from the University of Vermont (1978), and a BA in Philosophy, University of Vermont (1974). She teaches poetry workshops, translation workshops, and a variety of forms courses.

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