Professor Emeritus

Ira Clark (BA, New Mexico State University, 1962; PhD, Northwestern University, 1966) came to UF in 1972, after teaching at The Johns Hopkins University. He has published essays primarily on Christian and classical contexts of English Renaissance literature, culminating in Christ Revealed: The History of the Neotypological Lyric in the English Renaissance (1982) and a series of articles on Milton. He is also interested in style and the period’s reflection of social and political conditions in plays: Professional Playwrights: Massinger, Ford, Shirley, and Brome (1992), The Moral Art of Philip Massinger (1993), and Comedy, Youth, Manhood in Early Modern England (2003).

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Professor Emeritus

Bernard J. Paris

Bernard J. Paris (ret. 1996) received his PhD from The Johns Hopkins University in 1959 and taught at Lehigh University, Michigan State University, and the University of Florida. His primary areas of interest have been, in the order of their emergence, Victorian and comparative fiction, the psychological study of literature, Shakespeare, and the life and work of Karen Horney and her place in the history of psychoanalysis. He has received NEH and Guggenheim Fellowships and has been Visiting Professor at the Victorian Studies Centre of the University of Leicester.

His first book, Experiments in Life: George Eliot’s Quest for Values(1965) reflected his training in thematic analysis and the history of ideas. His subsequent work in literary criticism has been devoted to the development of a psychological approach to literature based on the theories of Karen Horney and other Third Force or Humanistic Psychologists, particularly Abraham Maslow. He has written seven books applying this approach to a variety of texts and critical issues: A Psychological Approach to Fiction: Studies in Thackeray, Stendhal, George Eliot, Dostoevsky, and Conrad (1974); Character and Conflict in Jane Austen’s Novels (1978); Bargains with Fate: Psychological Crises and Conflicts in Shakespeare and His Plays (1991); Character as a Subversive Force in Shakespeare: The History and the Roman Plays (1991); Imagined Human Beings: A Psychological Approach to Character and Conflict in Literature (1997); Rereading George Eliot: Changing Perspectives on Her Experiments in Life (2003); and Conrad’s Charlie Marlow: A New Approach to Heart of Darkness and Lord Jim (2005). He also edited Third Force Psychology and the Study of Literature (1986). Bargains With Fate and Imagined Human Beingshave been translated into Chinese. Four of the above-mentioned books are out ofprint but are available in electronic form via links from Professor Paris’s personal website, as are several essays and some chapters from Imagined Human Beings.

In addition to his work in literary criticism, he has written a biographical study, Karen Horney: A Psychoanalyst’s Search for Self-Understanding (1994; selected as a Notable Book by The New York Times, and since translated into German and Chinese.) In this book, he explores the relationship between Horney’s personal history and the evolution of her psychoanalytic ideas. He also tries to present a thorough account of her thought, to place it in relation to the history of psychoanalysis, and to make a case for its enduring power and importance. In the course of his research for the book, he discovered a number of unpublished essays and lectures by Horney, and edited these and her uncollected writings in two volumes for Yale University Press: The Therapeutic Process: Essays and Lectures (1999) and The Unknown Karen Horney: Essays on Gender, Culture, and Psychoanalysis (2000). In the early 1990s, he founded the International Karen Horney Society (IKHS), of which he is Director.

His 2003 study of George Eliot traces his shifting responses to her fiction over the years and uses himself as a case history to study the psychology of reader response. He also provides close readings of Middlemarch and Daniel Deronda, which many think to be her masterpieces. He was a true believer in her Religion of Humanity when he wrote Experiments in Life, but now strongly disagrees with her values and with her interpretations and judgments of her characters. But, he concludes, “she is a far greater genius than I realized back then in the creation of psychological portraits of imagined human beings.”

He is presently working on a new project, Dostoevsky’s Greatest Characters: Notes From Underground, Crime And Punishment, and The Brothers Karamazov.

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Marston-Milbauer Eminent Scholar

Norman Holland, the Marston-Milbauer Eminent Scholar in English, has, over a long career, explored how the human mind relates to literature. In the course of this inquiry, he has written twelve books and over two hundred articles in popular and professional magazines in America and abroad. He has lectured all over the world, not only in such familiar places as London, Paris, Rome, or Berlin, but in Sapporo, Benares, and even Katmandu. Writings of his have been translated into Chinese, Dutch, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Magyar, Russian, and Spanish.

Professor Holland has held Guggenheim and A.C.L.S. Fellowships. He is best known for his books concentrating psychoanalytic and cognitive psychology on literary questions: Psychoanalysis and Shakespeare (1966); The Dynamics of Literary Response (1968); Poems in Persons (1973); 5 Readers Reading (1975); Laughing (1982); The I (1985); The Brain of Robert Frost(1988); Holland’s Guide to Psychoanalytic Psychology and Literature-and-Psychology (1990); and The Critical I (1992), an interrogation of contemporary literary theory through what we think we know about the way our minds work. Death in a Delphi Seminar (1995) is a postmodern mystery set in a reader-response seminar. Professor Holland’s most recent book is Know Thyself: Delphi Seminars (with Murray M. Schwartz), developing a widely applicable teaching method based on students’ insights into their own writings and personalities.

Professor Holland retired in August 2008. Currently, he moderates the online discussion group PSYART and edits the online journal PSYART: A Hyperlink Journal for the Psychology of the Arts. In his current writings, he combines cognitive science with psychoanalytic psychology to arrive at new models of reading and aesthetic response.

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Professor

Richard Burt

Burt is currently writing a book trilogy titled Better Dead then Read, I Leave It to You, and Yours Posthumously, parts of which have been published in New Formations and rhizomes. He is the co-author, with Julian Yates, of What’s the Worst Thing You Can Do to Shakespeare?, the author of Medieval and Early Modern Film and Media, Unspeakable ShaXXXspeares: Queer Theory and American Kiddie Culture (St. Martin’s, 1998; rev. paperback, 1999), and other books.

He has also published more than forty articles and book chapters on topics including Shakespeare, Renaissance drama, literary theory, film adaptation, the Middle Ages in film and media, the erotics of pedagogy, stupidity, cinematic paratexts, biopolitics, posthumography, and censorship. He held a Fulbright scholarship in Berlin, Germany from 1995–96, and taught there at the Free University and the Humboldt University.

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Professor

Sidney Homan

Author of some twelve books and five collections of essays on Shakespeare and the modern playwrights, and an actor and director in commercial and university theatres, Sidney Homan has been named the university’s Teacher/Scholar of the Year. His prize-winning Beckett’s Theatres: Interpretations for Performance emerged from his tour of Florida prisons with a production of Waiting for Godot. In A Fish in the Moonlight, he recounts stories of his youth in South Philly and his experience telling them to children on the hospital’s Pediatric Bone Marrow Unit. Bloomsbury/Methuen has published Comedy Acting for Theatre: The Art and Craft of Performing in Comedies, which he wrote with the New York director Brian Rhinehart. And for Routledge Press he recently edited How and Why We Teach Shakespeare: Teachers and Directors Share How They Explore the Playwright with their Students. He has also written the libretto for the opera The Golem of Prague, with a score by Paul Richards.

Homan teaches ENL 4333 (Shakespeare), LIT 3041 (All Joking Aside: The Art and Craft of Comedy), LIT 3043 (Modern Drama—Learning by Doing), and LIT 6047 (An Evening with William Shakespeare), a graduate seminar whose project is a two-hour stage production of scenes from the playwright.

Professor Homan’s CV

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Professor

Trained as a Renaissance scholar, Professor Rudnytsky’s current areas of specialization include Freud, the history and theory of psychoanalysis, and psychoanalytic approaches to literature. He is the author of Reading Psychoanalysis: Freud, Rank, Ferenczi, Groddeck; Rescuing Psychoanalysis from Freud and Other Essays in Re-Vision; and other books. His co-edited books include: Psychoanalysis and Narrative Medicine and Her Hour Come Round at Last: A Garland for Nina Coltart. He is head of the Department of Academic and Professional Affairs and chair of the Committee on Psychoanalysis and the Academy of the American Psychoanalytic Association.

Currently, Rudnytsky coedits two book series: History of Psychoanalysis, with Professor Brett Kahr, published by Karnac Books; and Psychoanalytic Horizons, with Professors Esther Rashkin and Mari Ruti. Rudnytsky serves on the editorial boards of The Psychoanalytic Quarterly, The Psychoanalytic Review, Psychoanalytic Psychology, American Journal of Psychoanalysis, and Psychoanalysis and History. Professor Rudnytsky is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker and a Qualified Supervisor in Social Work in the State of Florida.

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  • office: Turlington Hall 4366
  • voice: (352) 294-2862
  • cell: (352) 339-2288
  • fax: (352) 392-0860
  • email: <plr@ufl.edu>

Associate Professor
Robert Thomson teaches courses in Folklore, The Ballad, The Folktale/Myth/Legend, Shakespeare, New Zealand Literature, Indigene Writers, and Post-Colonial Studies.

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