Albert Brick Professor

My most recent book, Victorian Skin: Surface, Self, History, focuses on the history of the body, medicine and realism in the nineteenth century, with special attention to skin and surface. This is an extension of my long-term work on the history of the body and medicine in the period, and on the history of genre. Other areas of interest include gender, popular literature and medical humanities. Some recent article publications include “Dreadful: Aesthetic Fear in Victorian Reading” in Dreadful Passions: Fear in the Literary and Medical Imagination Medieval to Modern; “How Disgust Entered the Ghost Story,” Routledge Handbook to the Ghost Story, (Scott Brewster and Luke Thurston, eds. London: Routledge, 2018: 409-417), “The Will to Touch: David Copperfield’s Hand.” 19: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Long Nineteenth Century (November 2014), and the coedited Encyclopedia of Victorian Literature in four volumes, Blackwell, 2015 (Coedited with Dino Felluga and Linda Hughes), which won the “Outstanding Reference Book” designation from the American Library Association, January 2016. I was a John Simon Guggenheim Fellow (2016) and Society for the Humanities Fellow at Cornell (2016-17).

I am on the executive committee for NAVSA (the North American Victorian Studies Association), and am organizing the 2018 conference in St. Petersburg, Florida. I also serve as elected representative on the Forum LLC Victorian and Early-20th-Century English group for the MLA (Modern Language Association) and on several editorial boards. I am the series editor for the SUNY Press book series Studies in the Long Nineteenth Century. At UF, I am affiliated with the Center for Women’s and Gender Studies and am a founding member of CISMaC, the Collective for the Interdisciplinary Study of Medicine and Culture. I regularly teach courses in Victorian Literature, Literature and Medicine, and topics in Victorian Gender and Class.

Professor Gilbert’s CV

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  • office: Turlington Hall 4008-D
  • voice: (352) 294-2828
  • fax: (352) 392-0860
  • email: <pgilbert@ufl.edu>
Professor

Tace Hedrick

Tace’s research is centered on two areas: US Latinx/Chicanx and Latin American Studies, focusing especially on cultural history; and popular genre studies, focusing on Latina/Chicana “chica lit” and gothic romance. Her current project is tentatively called “Queering the Cosmic Race: Spirituality, Sexuality, and Race in New Age Latin/o America, 1968-2010.” This project looks at a long twentieth-century history of how notions of race and sexuality were both shaped and filtered through Latin American, and later United States Latinx, receptions of spiritual belief systems such as teosofismo (Theosophy) and spiritismo (Spiritism). Discourses and images of race and sexuality (such as mestizaje, indigenismo, sexual eugenics) were more often than not mapped onto Latin American imaginings about the ancient ways of indigenous peoples. In turn, such images and ideas received through the filters of teosofimo, spiritismo, and what is now often called New Age re-manifest themselves in the ways Latinx/Chicanx artists and writers have re-imagined racialized and sexualized images and ideas from the late 1960s forward. The imagery of what sociologists of religion call New Religious Movements (NRM), attempted throughout the twentieth-century to respond to dominant discourses. These attempts are an important texture of the thinking both of the political and artistic elite as well as middle- and working-class Latin Americans in places as diverse as Chile, Mexico, and Puerto Rico. Thus I read the work of Latinx artists like Gloria Anzaldua, Walter Mercado, and Blank through a long twentieth century of exchanges between Latin American and US Latinx/Chicanx spiritual belief systems, such as the long-held supposed relationship between the cosmologies of Aztecs and Maya and those of South East Indian and Tibetan spiritualities.

Recent Talk:
“Walter Mercado, Sexuality, and ‘Oriental’ Mysticism in Latin America.” Latin American Studies Association (LASA).

Recent Publications:

“’The Spirits Talk to Us’: Regionalism, Poverty, and Romance in Mexican-American Gothic Fiction.” Studies in the Novel. 49.3 (Fall 2017): 322-340.

“Teaching Matters of Class and Style with Chica Lit.” Latina/o Literature in the Classroom: 21st Century Approaches to Teaching. Ed. Frederick Aldama. New York, NY: Routledge University Press. 2015. 202-217.

“History is What Hurts: Queer Temporalities and Alien Feelings in Gloria Anzaldúa.” Cultural History. Special Issue. Ed. Gregory Smithers. 4.1 (2015): 64-86.

Professor Hedrick’s CV

Contact

  • office: Ustler Hall 302
  • voice: (352) 273-0390
  • fax: (352) 392-0860
  • email: tace@ufl.edu
Professor

Dr. Debra Walker King is a full professor of English and an ordained minister of the African Methodist Episcopal Church. She is a graduate of Emory University (PhD), the University of North Carolina at Charlotte (MA) and North Carolina Central University (BA) recognized as a Patricia Harris Fellow, Ford Fellow and Schomburg Scholar. Her Administrative experience includes service as Associate Dean for the Humanities (College of Liberal Arts and Sciences) and Associate Provost for Academic Affairs (specializing in Affirmative Action and, later, Faculty Development). King is known nationally and internationally through publications that include single-author books such as African Americans and the Culture of Pain (University of Virginia Press, 2008) and Deep Talk: Reading African American Literary Names and Naming (Univ. Press of Virginia, 1998). Her current work on “Womanist Thought” has taken her as a lecturer and speaker to Shanghai University and Nanjing College in China as well as cities across this nation from Florida to California.

King is a motivational teacher who encourages the life visions of her students as she teaches. She is an affiliate professor with African American Studies and Women’s studies, cross listing course such as “Womanist Intellectual Thought,” “Black and White Women Writing about Race,” and “Survey of African American Literature.”

Professor King’s CV

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Professor

Presently, I am editing a volume on African American Film (at press), finishing a book on Afro-European Cinema and Culture, and working on a book about gender and sexuality in recent African American Film. During the 2017 summer, I presented “Barry Jenkins’ Moonlight (2016): Urban Sexual Blues as Fluid Agency” at the 34th International Conference on Psychology and the Arts in Palermo, Sicily. See my CV below for a complete list of my publications.

I take part in the Modern Language Association where I have held two delegate positions. I am a member of the Collegium for African American Research and the Psychology and the Arts organization. I hold two editorial board positions on the film journals Jump Cut and Screening Noir and have read manuscripts for such presses as MacMillan-Palgrave, Wallflower, SUNY, Cambridge, and most recently the Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Criminology and Criminal Justice. My University of Florida affiliations include the African American Studies Program, the Center for African Studies, and the Center for European Studies. I teach such courses as Black Drama, The World of James Baldwin and Critical Race Theory, Afro-European Literature and Culture, and The Harlem Renaissance.

Professor Reid’s CV

Contact

  • office: Turlington Hall 4318
  • voice: (352) 294-2827
  • fax: (352) 392-0860
  • email: <reid@ufl.edu>