Professor Emeritus

Richard Brantley joined the UF in 1969. His courses typically included Romanticism, the History of Criticism, and the Bible as Literature. He received several teaching awards and was appointed English Department Alumni/ae Professor 1993–1996.

Professor Brantley has concentrated much of his career on an interdisciplinary methodology that brings together philosophy, religion, and literature. His essays have appeared in such journals as Studies in English LiteratureEighteenth-Century StudiesStudies in RomanticismEighteenth Century Life, and Harvard Theological Review.

He is the author of Wordsworth’s “Natural Methodism” (Yale, 1975); Locke, Wesley, and the Method of English Romanticism (Florida, 1984); Coordinates of Anglo-American Romanticism: Welsey, Edwards, Carlyle, and Emerson (Florida, 1993); Anglo-American Antiphony: The Late Romanticism of Tennyson and Emerson (Florida, 1994);  Experience and Faith: The Late-Romantic Imagination of Emily Dickinson (Palgrave Macmillan, 2004); and Transatlantic trio: Empiricism, Evangelicalism, Romanticism – essays and reviews, 1974-2017 (2017).

Contact

Professor Emeritus
A. Carl Bredahl is a graduate of Princeton (BA, 1962) and the University of Pittsburgh (PhD, 1969). He was a member of the UF Department of English from 1970 to 2003, where his area of interest was American literature–particularly the continuity of and contradictions within the American imagination and, more recently, American literature of the West.

Professor Bredahl has published on numerous figures in American literature, from Charles Brockden Brown in the late eighteenth century to  contemporary writersTom Wolfe and Ivan Doig. He is the author of Melville’s Angles of Vision (1972); New Ground: Western American Narrative and the Literary Canon (1989); Hemingway’s Green Hills of Africa: Helix and Scimitar(with Susan Drake, 1990); and Ivan Doig (1999). In 1982-83, Professor Bredahl held  a Fulbright in India. From 1999–2000 and 2004-05, he was a Visiting Professor at the University of Utrecht, Netherlands.

Contact

Professor Emeritus

Ronald Carpenter received his PhD in Communication Arts from the University of Wisconsin, where his doctoral focus was rhetorical theory — particularly the canon of style in written discourse. He is the author of several books, including: The Eloquence of Frederick Jackson Turner (1983), History as Rhetoric: Style, Narrative, and Persuasion (1995), Father Charles E. Coughlin: Surrogate Spokesman for the Disaffected (1998), Rhetoric in Martial Deliberations and Decision Making: Cases and Consequences (2004), and co-author of Douglas MacArthur: Warrior as Wordsmith (1997). His many scholarly publications include book chapters in anthologies and research articles in journals such as Communication Monographs, Language and Style, Huntington Library Quarterly, Naval History, Communication Quarterly, Style, Presidential Studies Quarterly, U.S. Naval Institute Proceedings, Communication Studies, The Quarterly Journal of Speech, Marine Corps Gazette, and Army History. He also published a writing textbook, Choosing Powerful Words: Eloquence that Works (1999).

Professor Carpenter’s awards for scholarship and teaching include the National Communication Association Douglas Ehninger Distinguished Rhetorical Scholar Award (2004) and a Golden Anniversary Monograph Prize for Outstanding Scholarship (1984), the Southern States Communication Association Teacher-Scholar Award (1999), the endowed Giles Wilkeson Gray Lectureship at Louisiana State University (2001), listing in Communication Education as among the “Top 3% of Active Prolific Scholars in Communication Studies” (1993), and a University of Florida College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Outstanding Teacher Award (2001–2002) for his upper-division courses in rhetoric and composition. As a consultant, his “Write Well – Right Now” workshop-seminar is presented frequently for diverse groups including corporate executives, public relations professionals, public defenders, CPAs, speechwriters, judges, English teachers, incoming classes of officers at the U.S. Naval War College, and the California Bar Association.

Contact

Professor Emeritus

Ira Clark (BA, New Mexico State University, 1962; PhD, Northwestern University, 1966) came to UF in 1972, after teaching at The Johns Hopkins University. He has published essays primarily on Christian and classical contexts of English Renaissance literature, culminating in Christ Revealed: The History of the Neotypological Lyric in the English Renaissance (1982) and a series of articles on Milton. He is also interested in style and the period’s reflection of social and political conditions in plays: Professional Playwrights: Massinger, Ford, Shirley, and Brome (1992), The Moral Art of Philip Massinger (1993), and Comedy, Youth, Manhood in Early Modern England (2003).

Contact

Distinguished Professor Emerita

Patricia Craddock

Patricia Craddock is the author or editor of four books and many articles on Edward Gibbon, author of The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, including a two-volume biography, Young Edward Gibbon: Gentleman of Letters (1982) and Edward Gibbon: “Luminous” Historian (1989).

Her work has been supported by a Guggenheim Fellowship, two NEH senior fellowships, an ACLS grant-in-aid, and a fellowship at the Institute for Advanced Study (Princeton). She is the 1997–98 Catherine and Herbert Yardley Professor at the University of Florida. Formerly chair of the Department of English at Boston University, she came to the University of Florida as Professor and Chair of English in 1988 and served as chair until 1994. She has taught also at the University of Montevallo, Connecticut College, and Goucher College, and as a visiting professor at M.I.T.

As editor of Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture, she published two of the annual volumes of that journal, and she has served on the editorial boards of South Atlantic Review (1996–98),The Age of Johnson (1992–present), and the Georgia Smollett edition (1997–present). She has served as English Book Review editor of The Eighteenth Century: A Current Bibliography, the standard interdisciplinary bibliography in eighteenth-century studies.

Professor Craddock’s interests include children’s literature, nineteenth-century fiction and narrative theory in general, and Victorian literature, as well as all aspects of eighteenth-century British culture.  She is pursuing a book on The Historical Art of Edward Gibbon, and preparing an online  edition of the The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire.

Contact

Professor Emeritus

Alistair Duckworth has an MA from the University of Edinburgh and an MA and PhD from Johns Hopkins University. He has taught at the University of Virginia and, on summer or visiting appointments, at the University of Edinburgh; Mount Holyoke College.SUNY Buffalo; UNO Innsbruck; FSU Florence; and FSU London; He joined the UF faculty in 1973. In 1998 Professor Duckworth was designated the T. Walter Herbert Commemorative Term Professor, and in 1999 he received a SAADE Outstanding Teacher Award. He retired from UF in 2003 and has been employed since by FSU in London and Florence.

Professor Duckworth was a Guggenheim Fellow in 1978 and a visiting fellow at Magdalen College, Oxford, in 1988. He has published more than 100 essays and reviews on English fiction and the relations between literature and landscape. His The Improvement of the Estate: A Study of Jane Austen’s Novels (Johns Hopkins UP, 1971) was reissued in paperback with a new introduction in 1994. Other books are “Howards End”: E. M. Forster’s House of Fiction(1992) and (with David C. Streatfield) Landscapes in the Gardens and the Literature of Eighteenth-Century (1981). Bedford Books/ St Martin’s Press published his case-study edition of Forster’s Howards End (1997) and his case-study edition of Austen’s Emma.  (2002).

Professor Duckworth has served on the Editorial Board of the Cambridge UP edition of Jane Austen’s Works, (9 vols, 2005–07). He has lectured on Jane Austen at the University of Bologna, Goldsmith’s College of the University of London, the University of Lincoln, the University of Aberdeen, and the Scottish Branch of the Jane Austen Society.

Contact

Professor Emerita

Debora Greger

Debora Greger has published eight books of poetry: Movable Islands (1980), And (1985), The 1002nd Night (1990), Off-Season at the Edge of the World (1994), Desert Fathers, Uranium Daughters (1996), God (2001), Western Art (2004) and Men, Women, and Ghosts (2008). She has won the Grolier Prize, a Discovery/The Nation Award, the Award in Literature from the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters, the Peter I. B. Lavan Younger Poets Award, and the Brandeis University Award in Poetry. She was a winner of the Amy Lowell Poetry Traveling Scholarship and has received grants from the Ingram Merrill Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Guggenheim Foundation.

Professor Greger has been a fellow at the Bunting Institute (Radcliffe) and the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown. She teaches poetry workshops and seminars in poetry. Her degrees are from the University of Washington (BA, 1971) and the University of Iowa (MFA, 1974). She joined UF in 1988, after teaching at George Mason University and California State University, Chico. She has been a visiting professor at Ohio University; Wichita State University; Boise State University; and California State University, Fresno.

Contact

  • office: Turlington Hall 4211F
  • voice: (352) 392-6650, ext. 237
  • fax: (352) 392-0860
  • email: <dgreger@english.ufl.edu>

Professor Emeritus

R. Brandon KershnerR. Brandon Kershner received his MA from The Johns Hopkins Writing Seminars in 1966 and his PhD in English and Comparative Literature from Stanford University in 1972. He has been a member of the UF faculty since 1971.

He is the author of Dylan Thomas: The Poet and His Critics(1977); Joyce, Bakhtin, and Popular Literature (UNC Press, 1989), which won the 1990 award in literary criticism from the American Conference for Irish Studies; The Twentieth-Century Novel: An Introduction (Bedford Books, 1997); and numerous articles on Joyce, other modern writers, and topics within cultural studies. He is the editor of the critical edition of Joyce’s Portrait of the Artist from Bedford Books of St. Martin’s Press (1992), and two collections of essays on Joyce: Joyce and Popular Culture (UF Press, 1996) and Cultural Studies of Joyce (Rodopi, 2003). His poetry and translations have appeared in such journals as Poetry and APR.

Professor Kershner is serving a six-year term as a Trustee of the International James Joyce Foundation, and in 1999 was named University of Florida Alumni Professor of English.

Contact

Associate Professor Emeritus

Until his retirement from UF in 2007, Wayne Losano taught a variety of writing courses including Advanced Exposition, Professional Writing, and Science Writing. He is currently technical editor for the Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics and most recently has edited a series of business law books, one for each state plus the District of Columbia, for human resources personnel involved in such issues as hiring, employee termination, violence in the workplace, and sexual harassment.

Contact

Professor Emeritus

Kevin McCarthy received his BA in English (1963) from LaSalle College, his MA in American Literature (1966) from the University of North Carolina, and his PhD in Linguistics (1970) from the University of North Carolina. He was a member of the UF Department of English from 1969 to 2005, where he taught courses in Linguistics, Modern English Structure, History of the English Language, Writing About Football, and the Teaching of English as a Second Language.

His other teaching experiences include two years in the Peace Corps in Turkey (1963–65), one year as a Fulbright Professor in Lebanon (1971–72), and two years as a Fulbright Professor in Saudi Arabia (1982–84). He has also taught in the Linguistic Institute of America and in the Aegean Institute (Greece). Every other summer he teaches a course on the Maritime History of Greece to American college students on the Greek island of Paros. He and his wife spend a month each summer lecturing on cruise ships sailing in and around Europe. For 18 years he was the Executive Director of the Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings Society, produced its quarterly newsletter and planned its annual three-day meeting.

He has published 35 books, 30 of them about Florida, including Florida Lighthouses (1990), The Book Lover’s Guide to Florida (1992), Thirty Florida Shipwrecks (1992), African Americans in Florida (1993), The Gators and the Seminoles (1993), Twenty Florida Pirates (1994), Baseball in Florida (1996), Guide to the University of Florida and Gainesville (1997), Native Americans in Florida (1999), and Christmas in Florida (2000).

He has also testified as an “expert grammarian” in law cases dealing with the interpretation of language in contracts dealing with real estate, employee relations, and prenuptial contracts.

Contact